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Transparency, accountability and participation in the WASH sector in Andhra Pradesh, India

Research by WASHCost (India) in rural villages in Andhra Pradesh, India, has highlighted low levels of transparency, accountability and participation in crucial areas of decision making despite efforts by the State government to promote participatory processes. Most people out of a sample of 107 villages in Andhra Pradesh, feel they have little to say in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services are planned and implemented, while democratic structures to oversee good management of WASH services are failing to have an impact. Village water and sanitation committees (VWSCs) are supposed to be at the heart of village efforts to improve services – but the research in Andhra Pradesh shows that they either do not exist or are invisible to those they are supposed to be serving. [authors abstract]

TitleTransparency, accountability and participation in the WASH sector in Andhra Pradesh, India
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsFanaian, S., Chandrudu, M.V.R., McIntyre, P., Snehalatha, M., Subramanyam Naidu, R.
Secondary TitleWASHCost India briefing note
Pagination5 p.; 1 box
Date Published09/2011
PublisherWASHCost India and CESS
Place PublishedHyderabad
Publication LanguageEnglish
Keywordsindia andhra pradesh, rural areas, service delivery, WASHCost
Abstract

Research by WASHCost (India) in rural villages in Andhra Pradesh, India, has highlighted low levels of transparency, accountability and participation in crucial areas of decision making despite efforts by the State government to promote participatory processes. Most people out of a sample of 107 villages in Andhra Pradesh, feel they have little to say in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services are planned and implemented, while democratic structures to oversee good management of WASH services are failing to have an impact. Village water and sanitation committees (VWSCs) are supposed to be at the heart of village efforts to improve services – but the research in Andhra Pradesh shows that they either do not exist or are invisible to those they are supposed to be serving. [authors abstract]

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