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Building the capacity of local government to scale up community-led total sanitation and sanitation marketing in rural areas

The World Bank administered Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) recently passed the mid-point of the four-year
timeframe for its Global Scaling Up Sanitation Project (TSSM). TSSM tests proven and promising Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approaches to create community-wide demand for stopping open defecation and improving sanitation. It is coupled with the use of sanitation marketing techniques to further strengthen the demand for sanitation at the household level and improve the supply of affordable sanitation-related goods and services produced by the local private sector for the rural poor. One of the central premises of TSSM is that local governments can provide the vehicle to scale up rural sanitation. In all three TSSM countries—India, Indonesia, and Tanzania— local governments are at the center of the implementation arrangements. Scaling up through local governments is a logical choice because functioning local government administrations exist throughout most countries, and with increased decentralization, have been delegated the mandate for rural sanitation, and that local governments have the necessary infrastructure in place to play this role in
terms of staffing and resources. This report looks at the experience to date in three TSSM locations in developing the
capacity of local government to carry out its role in rural sanitation.

(authors abstract)

TitleBuilding the capacity of local government to scale up community-led total sanitation and sanitation marketing in rural areas
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsRosensweig, F., Kopitopoulos, D.
Pagination62 p.; fig.; tab.
Date Published2010-04-01
PublisherWater and Sanitation Program, WSP
Place PublishedWashington, DC, USA
Keywordsindia, indonesia, local level, marketing, rural areas, rural communities, rural supply systems, sanitation, social marketing, tanzania
Abstract

The World Bank administered Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) recently passed the mid-point of the four-year
timeframe for its Global Scaling Up Sanitation Project (TSSM). TSSM tests proven and promising Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approaches to create community-wide demand for stopping open defecation and improving sanitation. It is coupled with the use of sanitation marketing techniques to further strengthen the demand for sanitation at the household level and improve the supply of affordable sanitation-related goods and services produced by the local private sector for the rural poor. One of the central premises of TSSM is that local governments can provide the vehicle to scale up rural sanitation. In all three TSSM countries—India, Indonesia, and Tanzania— local governments are at the center of the implementation arrangements. Scaling up through local governments is a logical choice because functioning local government administrations exist throughout most countries, and with increased decentralization, have been delegated the mandate for rural sanitation, and that local governments have the necessary infrastructure in place to play this role in
terms of staffing and resources. This report looks at the experience to date in three TSSM locations in developing the
capacity of local government to carry out its role in rural sanitation.

(authors abstract)

NotesReferences, selected background readings
Custom 1305.2

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