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Realising safely managed sanitation in Bhutan

The Government of Bhutan’s vision is for all its citizens to have access to improved sanitation facilities by 2022. As to date, there is no baseline or targets for safely managed sanitation. Nevertheless, toilets will fill up and their contents will need to be safely managed to avoid faecal waste ending up in the environment.

This paper explores existing regulatory frameworks around faecal waste management, faecal sludge accumulation rates, and associated pit filling rates in the SSH4A programme districts.

Key points emerging from the research are:

  • Consider the presence or absence of pit emptying services when selecting the type of toilet to be constructed or installed.
  • Promote toilet designs that meet basic sanitation criteria, but that over time, can be easily upgraded to meet safely managed sanitation criteria.
  • Encourage construction of alternative toilet designs, such as alternating twin pits, that can be safely emptied by owners.
TitleRealising safely managed sanitation in Bhutan
Publication TypeBriefing Note
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsBaetings, E.
Secondary TitleSSH4A learning paper
Pagination16 p. : 11 fig., 2 ill.
Date Published12/2021
PublisherSNV and IRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, the Netherlands
Publication LanguageEnglish
Abstract

The Government of Bhutan’s vision is for all its citizens to have access to improved sanitation facilities by 2022. As to date, there is no baseline or targets for safely managed sanitation. Nevertheless, toilets will fill up and their contents will need to be safely managed to avoid faecal waste ending up in the environment.

This paper explores existing regulatory frameworks around faecal waste management, faecal sludge accumulation rates, and associated pit filling rates in the SSH4A programme districts.

Key points emerging from the research are:

  • Consider the presence or absence of pit emptying services when selecting the type of toilet to be constructed or installed.
  • Promote toilet designs that meet basic sanitation criteria, but that over time, can be easily upgraded to meet safely managed sanitation criteria.
  • Encourage construction of alternative toilet designs, such as alternating twin pits, that can be safely emptied by owners.
Notes

Includes 11 ref.

Citation Key88439

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.