Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

Projects

Briefing note. Building blocks for sustainability series

One out of three rural water supply systems in developing countries doesn't function at all or performs far below its promised level. How do you go from broken pumps and failing systems to reliable and lasting water services?

There are no one-size-fits-all models for change. Within the triple-S project a number of key actions in the shift towards sustainable delivery of water services have been identified. These 'building blocks' are described in the table below - on the left sides the clickable titles of the related briefing note to these building blocks.

Professionalisation of community management

Community management entities supported to move away from voluntary arrangements towards more professional service provision that is embedded in local and national policy, legal, and regulatory frameworks.

Professionalising community-based
management for rural water services

Recognition and promotion of alternative service provider options

A range of management options beyond community management, such as self-supply and public-private partnerships, formally recognised in sector policy and supported

Self-supply: the case for leveraging greater household investment in water supply

Public-private partnerships for rural water services

Monitoring service delivery and sustainability

Monitoring systems track indicators of infrastructure functionality, service provider performance, and levels of service delivered against nationally agreed norms and standards.

Service delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies

Harmonisation and coordination

Improved harmonisation and coordination among donors and government, and alignment of all actors (both government and nongovernment) with national policies and systems.

Making aid effective at the local level

Support to service providers

Structured system of direct (post-construction) support provided to back up and monitor community management entities and other service providers.

Direct support post construction to rural water service providers

Capacity support to local government

On-going capacity support provided to service authorities (typically local governments) to enable them to fulfil their role (planning, monitoring, regulation, etc.) in sustaining rural water services.

Capacity support to local government - summary sheet

Learning and adaptive management

Learning and knowledge management supported at national and decentralised levels to enable the sector to adapt based on experience.

Learning and adaptive management - summary sheet

Asset management

Systematic planning, inventory updates, and financial forecasting for assets carried out, and asset ownership clearly defined.

Asset management - summary sheet

Regulation of rural services and service providers

Regulation of the service delivered and service provider performance through mechanisms appropriate for small rural operators.

Regulation in rural areas

Financing to cover all life-cycle costs

Financial frameworks account for all life-cycle costs, especially major capital maintenance, support to service authorities and service providers, monitoring and regulation.

 

 

 

 

 

TitleBriefing note. Building blocks for sustainability series
Publication TypeBriefing Note
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsIRC
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
Abstract

One out of three rural water supply systems in developing countries doesn't function at all or performs far below its promised level. How do you go from broken pumps and failing systems to reliable and lasting water services?

There are no one-size-fits-all models for change. Within the triple-S project a number of key actions in the shift towards sustainable delivery of water services have been identified. These 'building blocks' are described in the table below - on the left sides the clickable titles of the related briefing note to these building blocks.

Professionalisation of community management

Community management entities supported to move away from voluntary arrangements towards more professional service provision that is embedded in local and national policy, legal, and regulatory frameworks.

Professionalising community-based
management for rural water services

Recognition and promotion of alternative service provider options

A range of management options beyond community management, such as self-supply and public-private partnerships, formally recognised in sector policy and supported

Self-supply: the case for leveraging greater household investment in water supply

Public-private partnerships for rural water services

Monitoring service delivery and sustainability

Monitoring systems track indicators of infrastructure functionality, service provider performance, and levels of service delivered against nationally agreed norms and standards.

Service delivery indicators and monitoring to improve sustainability of rural water supplies

Harmonisation and coordination

Improved harmonisation and coordination among donors and government, and alignment of all actors (both government and nongovernment) with national policies and systems.

Making aid effective at the local level

Support to service providers

Structured system of direct (post-construction) support provided to back up and monitor community management entities and other service providers.

Direct support post construction to rural water service providers

Capacity support to local government

On-going capacity support provided to service authorities (typically local governments) to enable them to fulfil their role (planning, monitoring, regulation, etc.) in sustaining rural water services.

Capacity support to local government - summary sheet

Learning and adaptive management

Learning and knowledge management supported at national and decentralised levels to enable the sector to adapt based on experience.

Learning and adaptive management - summary sheet

Asset management

Systematic planning, inventory updates, and financial forecasting for assets carried out, and asset ownership clearly defined.

Asset management - summary sheet

Regulation of rural services and service providers

Regulation of the service delivered and service provider performance through mechanisms appropriate for small rural operators.

Regulation in rural areas

Financing to cover all life-cycle costs

Financial frameworks account for all life-cycle costs, especially major capital maintenance, support to service authorities and service providers, monitoring and regulation.

 

 

 

 

 

Reprint Edition03/2015
Citation Key77323

Downloads

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.