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Beyond distance and time : gender and the burden of water collection in ural Uganda

Explored are the gender differences in water collection in Makondo Parish in Uganda as a case study. The analysis is based on data collected from a cross-sectional survey, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and participant observation in the study area. This data confirms that children and women are most burdened by water collection. Unless it is for commercial or work-related reasons or when there is a long drought, men rarely fetch water. Our study further reveals that children and women walk distances of less than half a kilometre to more than two kilometres on rugged and hilly roads and paths, carrying water on their heads or by hand. They spend a lot of time queuing at “improved” water sources, and suffer from health complications such as prolonged fatigue, chest pain and headache as a result of carrying water. Children and women are also distressed by the dangers of verbal and physical assault and rape at both “improved” and “unimproved” water points. We contend that whereas time and distance remain important determinants of the burden of water collection, socio-cultural, environmental and health-related conditions are equally critical in understanding the troubles that children and women face while collecting water in rural developing communities. [authors abstract]

TitleBeyond distance and time : gender and the burden of water collection in ural Uganda
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsAsaba, R.B., Honor Fagan, G., Kabonesa, C., Mugumya, F.
Paginationp. 31 - 38; 2 tab. 2 fig.
Date Published2013-03-01
PublisherUniversity of Pennsylvania, Department of Earth and Environmental Studies
Place PublishedPhiladelphia, PA, USA
Keywordsaccess to water, case studies, gender, rural communities, rural supply systems, uganda makondo parish, water collection time
Abstract

Explored are the gender differences in water collection in Makondo Parish in Uganda as a case study. The analysis is based on data collected from a cross-sectional survey, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and participant observation in the study area. This data confirms that children and women are most burdened by water collection. Unless it is for commercial or work-related reasons or when there is a long drought, men rarely fetch water. Our study further reveals that children and women walk distances of less than half a kilometre to more than two kilometres on rugged and hilly roads and paths, carrying water on their heads or by hand. They spend a lot of time queuing at “improved” water sources, and suffer from health complications such as prolonged fatigue, chest pain and headache as a result of carrying water. Children and women are also distressed by the dangers of verbal and physical assault and rape at both “improved” and “unimproved” water points. We contend that whereas time and distance remain important determinants of the burden of water collection, socio-cultural, environmental and health-related conditions are equally critical in understanding the troubles that children and women face while collecting water in rural developing communities. [authors abstract]

NotesRefferences on p. 37 - 38
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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.