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IRC conducted a budget expenditure tracking study in Kabarole and Lira districts, Uganda, to get a better understanding of how macro financial trends in the water and sanitation sector work out at district level. The study examines the financial flows, the district budget and expenditure on different rural water activities, and analyses changes in the size of budgets.

This report starts by providing some of the key concepts, drawing on the life-cycle costing approach. It then provides the methodology through which the study was carried out. It then presents the results, thereby highlighting the overall budgets and expenditure, the sources of funding (district government and NGOs), and the break-down of expenditure over life-cycle cost categories.

The report concludes that the relatively low allocation of financial resources towards recurrent costs of rural water suppy works against the delivery of adequate service levels. A key recommendation of the report is that the Ministry of Water and Environment should consider changing the District Water and Sanitation Conditional Grants (DWSCG) guidelines into policy directives that district local governments must adhere to when implementing water supply activities. The directives should also be clear on penalties for non-compliance.

TitleTracking district budgeting and expenditure on rural water services in Uganda : analysis report
Publication TypeWorking Paper
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsIRC Uganda
Pagination15 p.: 9 fig., 2 tab.
Date Published06/2015
PublisherIRC Uganda
Place PublishedKampala, Uganda
Publication LanguageEnglish
Abstract

IRC conducted a budget expenditure tracking study in Kabarole and Lira districts, Uganda, to get a better understanding of how macro financial trends in the water and sanitation sector work out at district level. The study examines the financial flows, the district budget and expenditure on different rural water activities, and analyses changes in the size of budgets.

This report starts by providing some of the key concepts, drawing on the life-cycle costing approach. It then provides the methodology through which the study was carried out. It then presents the results, thereby highlighting the overall budgets and expenditure, the sources of funding (district government and NGOs), and the break-down of expenditure over life-cycle cost categories.

The report concludes that the relatively low allocation of financial resources towards recurrent costs of rural water suppy works against the delivery of adequate service levels. A key recommendation of the report is that the Ministry of Water and Environment should consider changing the District Water and Sanitation Conditional Grants (DWSCG) guidelines into policy directives that district local governments must adhere to when implementing water supply activities. The directives should also be clear on penalties for non-compliance.

Notes

Includes 9 ref.

Citation Key79808

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

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