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This publication explores the factors that facilitate and inhibit the success of using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to report water supply sustainability. It is the final report of the "Lessons from ICT projects to improve rural water supplies" project (June 2014 - July 2015) carried out by WaterAid, ITAD and IRC as part of the Making All Voices Count initiative.

Examining eight initiatives that are using ICTs to monitor and report on water supply services in Kenya, India, Uganda, Tanzania, Timor Leste and Bolivia, the team discusses why some of these initiatives were successful and attempts to explain which approaches and context-specific conditions were key to achieving change.

Findings suggest that ICT initiatives for reporting on water supply functionality are more likely to be successful if the reports are government- or service provider-led rather than reliant on crowdsourcing, and when the ICT mechanism is the preferred method of reporting.

Other key factors that facilitate successful reporting include mobile phone reception, availability of mobile phone charging facilities and affordability of reporting by water users.

The processing of ICT reports is more likely to be successful if the related operational costs are met by a government body or service provider and not by a third agency such as an International Non-Governmental Organisation (INGO).

Internet connectivity, human resources and knowledge for processing, as well as the availability of back-up support to solve any problems with ICTs, are also crucial success factors.

The links to the research project and the related policy briefing are provided below.

TitleTesting the waters : a qualitative comparative analysis of the factors affecting success in rendering water services sustainable based on ICT reporting
Publication TypeResearch Report
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsWelle, K., Willams, J., Pearce, J., Befani, B.
Secondary TitleMaking All Voices Count
Pagination60 p. : 7 fig., 12 tab.
Date Published06/2015
PublisherInstitute of Development Studies, WaterAid, ITAD and IRC
Place PublishedBrighton, UK
Publication LanguageEnglish
Abstract

This publication explores the factors that facilitate and inhibit the success of using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to report water supply sustainability. It is the final report of the "Lessons from ICT projects to improve rural water supplies" project (June 2014 - July 2015) carried out by WaterAid, ITAD and IRC as part of the Making All Voices Count initiative.

Examining eight initiatives that are using ICTs to monitor and report on water supply services in Kenya, India, Uganda, Tanzania, Timor Leste and Bolivia, the team discusses why some of these initiatives were successful and attempts to explain which approaches and context-specific conditions were key to achieving change.

Findings suggest that ICT initiatives for reporting on water supply functionality are more likely to be successful if the reports are government- or service provider-led rather than reliant on crowdsourcing, and when the ICT mechanism is the preferred method of reporting.

Other key factors that facilitate successful reporting include mobile phone reception, availability of mobile phone charging facilities and affordability of reporting by water users.

The processing of ICT reports is more likely to be successful if the related operational costs are met by a government body or service provider and not by a third agency such as an International Non-Governmental Organisation (INGO).

Internet connectivity, human resources and knowledge for processing, as well as the availability of back-up support to solve any problems with ICTs, are also crucial success factors.

The links to the research project and the related policy briefing are provided below.

Notes

Includes 41 ref.

URLhttp://www.makingallvoicescount.org/publication/wateraid-the-success-of-ict-in-water-supply-sustainability/
Citation Key81529

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

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