Skip to main content

Tapping the market : opportunities for domestic investments in sanitation for the poor

This report examines private sector provision of on-site sanitation services in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Peru, and Tanzania, four countries where the local private sector already plays a major role in helping rural (and many urban) households construct and maintain sanitation. 

In each country, the study examines the preferences and circumstances of poor households and the performance of enterprises that provide sanitation-related services directly to them. It examines commercial and investment climate factors that may affect enterprises’ actual or perceived costs and risks, driving their decisions about increasing investment in their business. Specifically, the study seeks answers to the following questions:

  • Is lack of interest by the domestic private sector a rational response to weak market potential, or are lack of enterprise viability and the use of inappropriate business models preventing it from taking advantage of market opportunities?
  • Are investment climate factors increasing the (actual or perceived) costs and risks associated with doing business?

While the sanitation market in the four countries studied was found to be large, the report concludes that significant commercial and technological constraints are preventing the domestic private sector from tapping it:

  • enterprises are not offering products and services households want to buy; and
  • a weak investment climate s constraining investment
TitleTapping the market : opportunities for domestic investments in sanitation for the poor
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsSy, J., Warner, R.
EditionConference ed.
Paginationxv, 47 p. : 16 fig., 28 tab.
Date Published2013-08-01
PublisherWorld Bank
Place PublishedWashington, DC, USA
Keywordsbangladesh, case studies, indonesia, investment, on-site disposal, peru, private sector, sanitation services, tanzania
Abstract

This report examines private sector provision of on-site sanitation services in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Peru, and Tanzania, four countries where the local private sector already plays a major role in helping rural (and many urban) households construct and maintain sanitation. 

In each country, the study examines the preferences and circumstances of poor households and the performance of enterprises that provide sanitation-related services directly to them. It examines commercial and investment climate factors that may affect enterprises’ actual or perceived costs and risks, driving their decisions about increasing investment in their business. Specifically, the study seeks answers to the following questions:

  • Is lack of interest by the domestic private sector a rational response to weak market potential, or are lack of enterprise viability and the use of inappropriate business models preventing it from taking advantage of market opportunities?
  • Are investment climate factors increasing the (actual or perceived) costs and risks associated with doing business?

While the sanitation market in the four countries studied was found to be large, the report concludes that significant commercial and technological constraints are preventing the domestic private sector from tapping it:

  • enterprises are not offering products and services households want to buy; and
  • a weak investment climate s constraining investment
Notes15 ref.
Custom 1302.9, 320

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.