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Systems strengthening for sanitation; how does it work

Sanitation services are responsible for the safe management of faecal sludge. Generally, this involves six main processes: capture, containment, emptying, transport, treatment and safe reuse or disposal. A sewer network can substitute the containment and emptying steps. Together, each of these steps ensure the proper management of faecal waste and are collectively known as the sanitation service chain. As a chain, a weakness in one link has implications on the performance of the entire sanitation service.

For a service to be deemed safely managed, all human waste captured at the beginning must ultimately be safely reused or disposed of at the end of the chain. The principal goal being, to keep human faecal waste contained throughout the sanitation chain. 

Applying a systems-strengthening approach to the sanitation chain means looking at the chain in its entirety—and making sure that each link is present and secure. It is only by ensuring that each segment of the sanitation chain works well that we can manage faecal waste properly, reduce environmental harm and health risks and ensure safe sanitation services that last for all.

TitleSystems strengthening for sanitation; how does it work
Publication TypeAudiovisual
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsIRC
Secondary TitleWASH Systems Academy Animation
Pagination1 min 45
Date Published03/2019
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague
Publication LanguageEnglish
Abstract

Sanitation services are responsible for the safe management of faecal sludge. Generally, this involves six main processes: capture, containment, emptying, transport, treatment and safe reuse or disposal. A sewer network can substitute the containment and emptying steps. Together, each of these steps ensure the proper management of faecal waste and are collectively known as the sanitation service chain. As a chain, a weakness in one link has implications on the performance of the entire sanitation service.

For a service to be deemed safely managed, all human waste captured at the beginning must ultimately be safely reused or disposed of at the end of the chain. The principal goal being, to keep human faecal waste contained throughout the sanitation chain. 

Applying a systems-strengthening approach to the sanitation chain means looking at the chain in its entirety—and making sure that each link is present and secure. It is only by ensuring that each segment of the sanitation chain works well that we can manage faecal waste properly, reduce environmental harm and health risks and ensure safe sanitation services that last for all.

URLhttps://youtu.be/9rTyvA8OXRA

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.