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TitleSustainable transfer of manual well dril[l]ing to the private sector in Niger : case study
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsUNICEF - New York, US
Pagination8 p.; 1 box; 1 fig.; 7 photographs; 2 tab.
Date Published2009-08-01
PublisherPractica Foundation
Place PublishedPapendrecht, The Netherlands
Keywordscase studies, manual drilling, niger, sustainable development, water supply, well drilling
Abstract

This case study examines the impact of professional manual drilling operations on the access to potable water. For many years there was the lack of a coordinated effort and continuity of approach, which slowed the emergence of the manual drilling sector. The development of the private manual well drilling sector was encouraged by three large small-scale irrigation projects funded by the World Bank and the European Union. There was, however, no spontaneous transfer of manual drilling from the irrigation sector to the rural water supply sector. Advocacy of the methodology by UNICEF has demonstrated how manual drilling can complement other methods of supplying water to rural communities. UNICEF has funded several demonstration programs and the mapping of areas suitable for manual
drilling in Niger. For a professional manual drilling sector to further develop in Niger there remains a need to simultaneously upgrade
the technical ability and management efficiency of the drilling enterprises and to integrate a new cadre of quality control companies
into manual drilling activities. Critically important for the completion of successful and sustainable rural water supply programs are
improved training and follow-up for water users and a viable supply chain for pumps including maintenance. This applies throughout
the rural water supply sector and is not restricted to manual drilling activities. [authors abstract]

NotesWith 8 references and 11 additional resources
Custom 1824

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