Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

Small town water services : trends, challenges and models

Relatively new and emerging categories of human settlements, such as small towns, may require a different set of service arrangements to facilitate the provision of water. In this paper, Adank presents the main features and understanding of what constitutes "small towns" to determine the most appropriate water service arrangement for this new phenomenon. Findings of the paper point out to challenges in developing a clear typology for small towns and assigning one single model for delivering small town water services. Amidst this layer of ambiguity however, Adank draws examples from different arrangements serving "small towns" in countries, and provides compelling evidence that: a) different models and arrangements have been tested and have worked; b) there is a growing role for private sector involvement; and c) there is a need to revisit institutional and regulatory frameworks, as well as funding models, to finance capital maintenance. This paper concludes with a list of resources for further reading, and provides contact details of some organisations whose work focus on "small towns".[author abstract]

TitleSmall town water services : trends, challenges and models
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsAdank, M
Secondary TitleThematic overview paper / IRC
Volume27
Pagination70 p. : 19 boxes, 7 fig., 2 tab.
Date Published2013-12-01
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
Keywordsliterature reviews, models, service delivery, small towns, water management
Abstract

Relatively new and emerging categories of human settlements, such as small towns, may require a different set of service arrangements to facilitate the provision of water. In this paper, Adank presents the main features and understanding of what constitutes "small towns" to determine the most appropriate water service arrangement for this new phenomenon. Findings of the paper point out to challenges in developing a clear typology for small towns and assigning one single model for delivering small town water services. Amidst this layer of ambiguity however, Adank draws examples from different arrangements serving "small towns" in countries, and provides compelling evidence that: a) different models and arrangements have been tested and have worked; b) there is a growing role for private sector involvement; and c) there is a need to revisit institutional and regulatory frameworks, as well as funding models, to finance capital maintenance. This paper concludes with a list of resources for further reading, and provides contact details of some organisations whose work focus on "small towns".[author abstract]

Notes

Includes 52 references

Custom 1

201

Downloads

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.