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From sanitation to development : the case of the Baldia soakpit pilot project

The book describes a community-based sanitation project which was carried out in a low-income urban area in Karachi, Pakistan, between 1979 and 1986. The main emphasis is on the involvement and motivation of the local communities, especially women, in sanitation and how this led to other development activities. The three main project components were on-site sanitation, home schools and primary health care. Social organization and management, technical designs, physical output, costs, training and sustainability of the activities are analyzed. The same community-based model was used for all components: demand-oriented and maximising community inputs, not only in financial terms but also in planning and implementation. The impact of the project at national, municipal and community level is discussed and examples are given of other projects which incorporated components of the Baldia project. The final chapter deals with the key issues and the lessons learned.

TitleFrom sanitation to development : the case of the Baldia soakpit pilot project
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication1992
AuthorsBakhteari, Q.A., Wegelin-Schuringa, M.H.A.
Secondary TitleTechnical paper series / IRC
Volumeno. 31
Paginationxii, 100 p.: 15 fig., 9 tab.
Date Published1992-01-01
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
ISBN Number9066870214
Keywordscab92/6, case studies, community participation, demonstration projects, design, drainage, impact, non-governmental organizations, pakistan karachi, baldia, peri-urban communities, pour flush latrines, primary health care, schools, women
Abstract

The book describes a community-based sanitation project which was carried out in a low-income urban area in Karachi, Pakistan, between 1979 and 1986. The main emphasis is on the involvement and motivation of the local communities, especially women, in sanitation and how this led to other development activities. The three main project components were on-site sanitation, home schools and primary health care. Social organization and management, technical designs, physical output, costs, training and sustainability of the activities are analyzed. The same community-based model was used for all components: demand-oriented and maximising community inputs, not only in financial terms but also in planning and implementation. The impact of the project at national, municipal and community level is discussed and examples are given of other projects which incorporated components of the Baldia project. The final chapter deals with the key issues and the lessons learned.

Notes18 ref.
Custom 1323.1, 822

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.