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The political economy of sanitation : how can we increase investment and improve service for the poor? : WSP sanitation global practice team operational experiences from case studies in Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Senegal

About half of the world’s population suffers from lack access to basic sanitation. There is ongoing concern that governments, at many levels, are not devoting enough attention and resources to sanitation services, particularly when compared to spending on water supply and other infrastructure services. Additionally, existing sanitation investments and service provision rarely place sufficient stress upon the distinct and urgent needs of the poor. Recent World Bank research shows that this limited focus on sanitation is driven largely by political motivation in the context of competing demands for resources, and to a lesser extent by technical or economic considerations. [authors abstract]

TitleThe political economy of sanitation : how can we increase investment and improve service for the poor? : WSP sanitation global practice team operational experiences from case studies in Brazil, India, Indonesia, and Senegal
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsGarbarino, S., Holland, J.
Paginationiii, 85 p.; 4 tab.; 11 fig.; 4 boxes
Date Published2011-02-01
PublisherWater and Sanitation Program, WSP
Place PublishedS.l.
Keywordsbrazil, case studies, india, indonesia, investment, senegal
Abstract

About half of the world’s population suffers from lack access to basic sanitation. There is ongoing concern that governments, at many levels, are not devoting enough attention and resources to sanitation services, particularly when compared to spending on water supply and other infrastructure services. Additionally, existing sanitation investments and service provision rarely place sufficient stress upon the distinct and urgent needs of the poor. Recent World Bank research shows that this limited focus on sanitation is driven largely by political motivation in the context of competing demands for resources, and to a lesser extent by technical or economic considerations. [authors abstract]

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