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Mechanisms to ensure pro-poor water service delivery in peri-urban areas

A large part of the urban poor lives in high-density formal, informal or illegal urban settlements. Often, these areas are not served by the piped network of the utility and might never be served, especially in case of informal and illegal settlements. Even when the poor live in an area served by the utility, they face financial and legal barriers in order to get access to the pipes water services. And even when they are connected, there is no guarantee that the utility is able to provide them with good quality and reliable water services. A large part of the urban poor get their water from alternative water service providers.The role of these alternative providers needs to be recognised.In order to improve services for the urban poor, some things need to change. First of all, utilities and regulators need to accept different levels of services (ranging from household connections to public standpipes), and different models of service delivery (ranging from utilities to independent service providers). This would mean that policies, legislation and regulation will have to change to end the monopoly rights of utilities and to legislate other models. In addition, in order to ensure high quality, affordable services, the role of the regulator has to be extended beyond the utility. [authors abstract]

TitleMechanisms to ensure pro-poor water service delivery in peri-urban areas
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsRyan, P., Adank, M.D.
Secondary TitleTPP Working Documents [The Tripartite Partnership Project]
Pagination21 p.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.; 9 boxes
Date Published2010-05-01
Keywordsaccess to water, peri-urban communities, poverty, service delivery, water management, water supply, water supply and sanitation in peri-urban areas and small centres programme
Abstract

A large part of the urban poor lives in high-density formal, informal or illegal urban settlements. Often, these areas are not served by the piped network of the utility and might never be served, especially in case of informal and illegal settlements. Even when the poor live in an area served by the utility, they face financial and legal barriers in order to get access to the pipes water services. And even when they are connected, there is no guarantee that the utility is able to provide them with good quality and reliable water services. A large part of the urban poor get their water from alternative water service providers.The role of these alternative providers needs to be recognised.In order to improve services for the urban poor, some things need to change. First of all, utilities and regulators need to accept different levels of services (ranging from household connections to public standpipes), and different models of service delivery (ranging from utilities to independent service providers). This would mean that policies, legislation and regulation will have to change to end the monopoly rights of utilities and to legislate other models. In addition, in order to ensure high quality, affordable services, the role of the regulator has to be extended beyond the utility. [authors abstract]

NotesWith bibliography on p. 16 - 18
Custom 1202.0, 824

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.