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Only in the last couple of years, in low income countries, have governments and development partners recognised the need for reliable cost information for water and sanitation services. From a monitoring perspective, it is important to know who needs to monitor finance and for what purposes. Local government needs to know the costs of sustaining services in its jurisdiction, the systems that need replacement or repair, the costs of post-construction support, and the sources of finance required. Even when government financial systems are well developed, it is not easy to make cost data understandable and to relate these to service delivery outcomes. Infrastructure development is spread over different organisations, each one often using its own financial systems, and most of them designed to monitor the costs and finance for providing access to infrastructure and not for delivering services. Ultimately, financial monitoring will be useful only if governments lead in setting the service-level standards they want to deliver to citizens.

TitleMaking the invisible visible : monitoring the costs and finance needed for sustainable WASH service delivery
Publication TypeBook Chapter
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsFonseca, C.
Secondary TitleSchouten, T. & Smits, S., 2015. From infrastructure to services : trends in monitoring sustainable water, sanitation and hygiene services
Chapter2
Paginationp. 21-37
Date Published04/2015
PublisherIRC and Practical Action
Place PublishedRugby, UK
Publication LanguageEnglish
ISBN Number9781853398131 (hardback), 9781853398148 (paperback), 9781780448145 (ebook)
Abstract

Only in the last couple of years, in low income countries, have governments and development partners recognised the need for reliable cost information for water and sanitation services. From a monitoring perspective, it is important to know who needs to monitor finance and for what purposes. Local government needs to know the costs of sustaining services in its jurisdiction, the systems that need replacement or repair, the costs of post-construction support, and the sources of finance required. Even when government financial systems are well developed, it is not easy to make cost data understandable and to relate these to service delivery outcomes. Infrastructure development is spread over different organisations, each one often using its own financial systems, and most of them designed to monitor the costs and finance for providing access to infrastructure and not for delivering services. Ultimately, financial monitoring will be useful only if governments lead in setting the service-level standards they want to deliver to citizens.

DOI10.3362/9781780448138.002

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

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