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Life-cycle costs approach : glossary and cost components

This briefing note describes the cost components in the life-cycle costs approach. Life-cycle costs (LCC) represent the aggregate costs of ensuring delivery of adequate, equitable and sustainable WASH services to a population in a specified area. These costs include the construction and maintenance of systems in the short and longer term, taking into account the need for hardware and software, operation and maintenance, capital maintenance, the cost of capital, source protection, and the need for direct and indirect support, including training, planning and institutional pro-poor support. The delivery of sustainable services also requires that financial systems are in place to ensure that infrastructure can be replaced at the end of its useful life and to extend delivery systems in response to increases in demand. This is the ‘life-cycle’ at the heart of this approach - what is needed to sustain, repair and replace a water (or sanitation) system through the whole of its cycle of wear, repair and renewal.

TitleLife-cycle costs approach : glossary and cost components
Publication TypeBriefing Note
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsFonseca, C, Franceys, R, Batchelor, C, McIntyre, P, Klutse, A, Komives, K, Moriarty, PB, Naafs, A, Nyarko, K, Pezon, C, Potter, A, Reddy, R, Snehalatha, M
Secondary TitleWASHCost briefing note
Volumeno. 1
Pagination12 p. : 2 tab.
Date Published2010-04-01
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
Keywordscosts, hygiene, sanitation services, sdiman, sustainability, WASHCost, water supply services
Abstract

This briefing note describes the cost components in the life-cycle costs approach. Life-cycle costs (LCC) represent the aggregate costs of ensuring delivery of adequate, equitable and sustainable WASH services to a population in a specified area. These costs include the construction and maintenance of systems in the short and longer term, taking into account the need for hardware and software, operation and maintenance, capital maintenance, the cost of capital, source protection, and the need for direct and indirect support, including training, planning and institutional pro-poor support. The delivery of sustainable services also requires that financial systems are in place to ensure that infrastructure can be replaced at the end of its useful life and to extend delivery systems in response to increases in demand. This is the ‘life-cycle’ at the heart of this approach - what is needed to sustain, repair and replace a water (or sanitation) system through the whole of its cycle of wear, repair and renewal.

Notes

2 ref. - Includes glossary

Custom 1

202.8, 302.8

Citation Key67513

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.