Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

Lessons learned from SWASH+ phase I : a synthesis of interviews from four US-Based staff from Emory University and CARE

The purpose of the School Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Plus Community Impact (SWASH+) project was to answer the question “What is the impact of a school-based water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) intervention on pupil absence, helminth infection, and diarrhea?” However, this project also focused on how to sustain and scale school WASH interventions. Specifically, SWASH+ aimed to develop and test a scalable model for school WASH, and to influence the Kenyan government to adopt proven interventions. Findings gathered over the course of the multi-year project show that lack of sustainability in school WASH interventions can strongly limit impact. Four SWASH+ staff reflected on their impressions of the project’s evolution with regard to sustainability in three areas: research, advocacy, and management and coordination. [authors abstract]

This is a one-page summary.

This is a SWASH+ -output.

TitleLessons learned from SWASH+ phase I : a synthesis of interviews from four US-Based staff from Emory University and CARE
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsLochery, P.W.S., Keene, B., Dreibelbis, R., Green, L.
Pagination1 p.
Date Published2012-08-01
PublisherSWASH+ Kenya
Place PublishedNairobi, Kenya
Keywordsschool sanitation and hygiene education program, schools, water, sanitation and hygiene [WASH]
Abstract

The purpose of the School Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Plus Community Impact (SWASH+) project was to answer the question “What is the impact of a school-based water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) intervention on pupil absence, helminth infection, and diarrhea?” However, this project also focused on how to sustain and scale school WASH interventions. Specifically, SWASH+ aimed to develop and test a scalable model for school WASH, and to influence the Kenyan government to adopt proven interventions. Findings gathered over the course of the multi-year project show that lack of sustainability in school WASH interventions can strongly limit impact. Four SWASH+ staff reflected on their impressions of the project’s evolution with regard to sustainability in three areas: research, advocacy, and management and coordination. [authors abstract]

This is a one-page summary.

This is a SWASH+ -output.

Custom 1140

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.