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Learning about community water and sanitation action plans

Waterborne and sanitation related diseases such as cholera, yellow fever, hepatitis, diarrhoea and typhoid claim the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in Ethiopia each year. In 2004 only 80 percent of the urban and 7 percent of the rural population had access to improved water supply systems (UNICEF/WHO, 2006), and many of these are facing important water quality problems. Considerable efforts are underway however to improve the situation, with the result that the number of improved systems is growing but monitoring and maintenance is not well developed.
Hence an urgent need exists to establish possible water pollution hazards and performance problems in rural water supply and sanitation systems which can have adverse health effects on consumers and mitigate these hazards where possible. Key water sector staff at Woreda level from government agencies and NGOs is in a very good position to help communities to ensure that their water and sanitation systems can be improved and sustained. To help sector staff in this role a practical training course has been established. [authors abstract]

TitleLearning about community water and sanitation action plans
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
AuthorsVisscher, J.T., Adank, M.D., Tucker, J., Knoop, L., Butterworth, J., Chaka, T., Getachew, F., Zewdie, Z.A., Ludi, E., Nicol, A., Calow, R.
Pagination88 p.; ill.; tab.;fig.; boxes; photographs
Date Published2010-01-01 ?
PublisherRiPPLE, Research-inspired Policy and Practice Learning in Ethiopia and the Nile region
Place PublishedS.l.
Keywordsaccess to sanitation, access to water, disease control, ethiopia, water quality, water quality monitoring, water quality standards
Abstract

Waterborne and sanitation related diseases such as cholera, yellow fever, hepatitis, diarrhoea and typhoid claim the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in Ethiopia each year. In 2004 only 80 percent of the urban and 7 percent of the rural population had access to improved water supply systems (UNICEF/WHO, 2006), and many of these are facing important water quality problems. Considerable efforts are underway however to improve the situation, with the result that the number of improved systems is growing but monitoring and maintenance is not well developed.
Hence an urgent need exists to establish possible water pollution hazards and performance problems in rural water supply and sanitation systems which can have adverse health effects on consumers and mitigate these hazards where possible. Key water sector staff at Woreda level from government agencies and NGOs is in a very good position to help communities to ensure that their water and sanitation systems can be improved and sustained. To help sector staff in this role a practical training course has been established. [authors abstract]

NotesWith about 30 references within te text.
Custom 1202.1, 302.1

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.