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Kenya water for schools project : evaluation report

Safe drinking water and hygiene are essential to reducing the diarrheal disease burden in Kenya. In February 2005, CARE implemented the Water for Schools Program in 45 public primary schools in Rachuonyo, Homa Bay, and Suba districts in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Two teachers from each of the schools were trained in correct use of the point-of-use water treatment products and proper handwashing practices, were provided training and education materials, and were instructed to form safe water clubs with students of all grades, teach about the benefits of safe water and hygiene to their students. Students were encouraged to discuss the program with their parents. Hardware distributed to the participating schools included traditional clay pots, modified for safe storage with a narrow mouth, lid, and spigot; a one-year supply of WaterGuard, a sodium hypochlorite solution used for purifying water; 200-liter plastic handwashing tanks; and soap. These activities were completed between May and July 2005. It is estimated that over 15,000 primary school children benefited directly from this project. [authors abstract]

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TitleKenya water for schools project : evaluation report
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsCommunity Watershed Partnership, CWP
Pagination73 p.; 2 fig.; 5 tab.
Date Published2006-09-18
PublisherCenter for Global Safe Water at Emory University
Place PublishedNairobi, Kenya
Keywordsdrinking water, kenya, safe water supply, schools, sdihyg, toilet hygiene
Abstract

Safe drinking water and hygiene are essential to reducing the diarrheal disease burden in Kenya. In February 2005, CARE implemented the Water for Schools Program in 45 public primary schools in Rachuonyo, Homa Bay, and Suba districts in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Two teachers from each of the schools were trained in correct use of the point-of-use water treatment products and proper handwashing practices, were provided training and education materials, and were instructed to form safe water clubs with students of all grades, teach about the benefits of safe water and hygiene to their students. Students were encouraged to discuss the program with their parents. Hardware distributed to the participating schools included traditional clay pots, modified for safe storage with a narrow mouth, lid, and spigot; a one-year supply of WaterGuard, a sodium hypochlorite solution used for purifying water; 200-liter plastic handwashing tanks; and soap. These activities were completed between May and July 2005. It is estimated that over 15,000 primary school children benefited directly from this project. [authors abstract]

This is a SWASH+ -output.

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.