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A hidden resource: household-led rural water supply in Ethiopia

Self Supply involves households taking the lead in their own development, making investments in the construction, upgrading and maintenance of their own water sources, lifting devices and storage facilities. In Ethiopia, traditional or family wells are common, providing access by the owners and their neighbours to a vital resource. Yet Self Supply’s contribution to providing water services is hidden. It has not been officially recognised until recently, and programmes to make it safer and more widespread are only on the drawing board. This report brings together the findings of two complementary research studies on the role of Self Supply in rural water services provision in two different regions of Ethiopia, Oromia and the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region. It aims to help fill some of the gaps in our knowledge about the existing performance of traditional wells, especially water quality, and the reasons that motivate families to build, improve and maintain their own water sources. [authors abstract]

TitleA hidden resource: household-led rural water supply in Ethiopia
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSutton, S., Butterworth, J., Mekonta, L.
Paginationxiv,74 p.; ill.; fig.; tab.; boxes
Date Published2012-01-01
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
ISSN Number9789066870802
Keywordsethiopia, rural supply systems, water supply
Abstract

Self Supply involves households taking the lead in their own development, making investments in the construction, upgrading and maintenance of their own water sources, lifting devices and storage facilities. In Ethiopia, traditional or family wells are common, providing access by the owners and their neighbours to a vital resource. Yet Self Supply’s contribution to providing water services is hidden. It has not been officially recognised until recently, and programmes to make it safer and more widespread are only on the drawing board. This report brings together the findings of two complementary research studies on the role of Self Supply in rural water services provision in two different regions of Ethiopia, Oromia and the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region. It aims to help fill some of the gaps in our knowledge about the existing performance of traditional wells, especially water quality, and the reasons that motivate families to build, improve and maintain their own water sources. [authors abstract]

Notes

With references on p. 57 - 58

Custom 1

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.