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A guide to rainwater harvesting in Malaysia

Malaysia is blessed with an ample supply of water thanks to abundant rains. However, increasing usage by industry, in agriculture and by household users is straining the existing water supply infrastructure. The costs of adding to this infrastructure and that of replacing the ageing system are further burdening the Exchequer.
At present Malaysia primarily depends upon rainwater that falls over the hills and in the countryside and which is then collected into large reservoirs and as groundwater. This water is pumped into treatment plants and from there distributed through the water mains and a network of pipes. This booklet presents some useful information on rainwater, and it aims to provide an understanding of many of the relevant aspects of rain with a view to harvesting it for both domestic and industrial use directly from the rooftops, thereby allowing benefiting from this bountiful resource delivered free to us by nature.
The history of rainwater harvesting in Asia can be traced back to about the 9th or 10th century, to the small-scale collection of rainwater from roofs and simple brush dam constructions in the rural areas of South and South-east Asia. Rainwater collection from the eaves of roofs or via simple gutters into traditional jars and pots has been traced back almost 2,000 years in Thailand. Rainwater harvesting has also long been used in the Loess Plateau regions of China.
A simple method of harvesting rainwater, storing and using it is presented.

TitleA guide to rainwater harvesting in Malaysia
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
AuthorsSehgal, JD
Pagination41 p.
Date Published2005-11-01 ?
PublisherRotary Club
Place PublishedJohor Bahru, Malaysia
Keywordsguidelines, malaysia, rainwater harvesting, sdiasi, sdiwat, water use
Abstract

Malaysia is blessed with an ample supply of water thanks to abundant rains. However, increasing usage by industry, in agriculture and by household users is straining the existing water supply infrastructure. The costs of adding to this infrastructure and that of replacing the ageing system are further burdening the Exchequer.
At present Malaysia primarily depends upon rainwater that falls over the hills and in the countryside and which is then collected into large reservoirs and as groundwater. This water is pumped into treatment plants and from there distributed through the water mains and a network of pipes. This booklet presents some useful information on rainwater, and it aims to provide an understanding of many of the relevant aspects of rain with a view to harvesting it for both domestic and industrial use directly from the rooftops, thereby allowing benefiting from this bountiful resource delivered free to us by nature.
The history of rainwater harvesting in Asia can be traced back to about the 9th or 10th century, to the small-scale collection of rainwater from roofs and simple brush dam constructions in the rural areas of South and South-east Asia. Rainwater collection from the eaves of roofs or via simple gutters into traditional jars and pots has been traced back almost 2,000 years in Thailand. Rainwater harvesting has also long been used in the Loess Plateau regions of China.
A simple method of harvesting rainwater, storing and using it is presented.

NotesIncludes references
Custom 1822, 213.1

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.