Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

Financing strategies for water and environmental infrastructure

As a result of detailed in-country studies, a computer-based decision support tool has been developed called FEASIBLE. The model can assess the levels of finance that might be available under different macro-economic conditions. It can also help to assess the potential social implications of increasing tariffs by determining the impacts of such price increases on household income.
It is stressed that the application of this tool and related methodologies is not just a technical exercise: by engaging all stakeholders involved, it helps build a consensus that facilitates effective programme implementation and the achievement of environmental goals.
The environmental financing strategy methodology can be a useful tool for governments in developing realistic plans to achieve nationally or internationally agreed targets. The underlying assumption is that governments should not finance all or most expenditur, or sponsor all or most projects. Relying on the public budget to finance operational and maintenance costs of collective infrastructure for example, is not a sustainable solution. The main role of government in relation to finance is to establish the policy, regulatory and institutional framework within which resources from users, financial markets, local budgets and enterprises can be mobilised in a complementary way, and applied as cost-effectively as possible to achieve agreed goals. Hence, the financing strategies can be useful not only to help plan the government budget, but also in suggesting how policy instruments that affect the capacities and decisions of other public and private financial agents might be reformed.

TitleFinancing strategies for water and environmental infrastructure
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsOECD -Paris, FR, Danish Cooperation for Environment in Eastern Europe -Copenhagen, DK, DANCEE
Secondary TitleEnvironmental finance / OECD
Pagination114 p. : boxes, fig., tab.
Date Published2003-05-01
PublisherOECD
Place PublishedParis, France
ISBN Number9264102760
Keywordscaucasus, central asian republics, computer programs, decision support systems, eastern europe, financial management, financing, investment, models, policies, sdiman, solid wastes, uebw, urban areas, wastewater collection, wastewater treatment, water supply
Abstract

As a result of detailed in-country studies, a computer-based decision support tool has been developed called FEASIBLE. The model can assess the levels of finance that might be available under different macro-economic conditions. It can also help to assess the potential social implications of increasing tariffs by determining the impacts of such price increases on household income.
It is stressed that the application of this tool and related methodologies is not just a technical exercise: by engaging all stakeholders involved, it helps build a consensus that facilitates effective programme implementation and the achievement of environmental goals.
The environmental financing strategy methodology can be a useful tool for governments in developing realistic plans to achieve nationally or internationally agreed targets. The underlying assumption is that governments should not finance all or most expenditur, or sponsor all or most projects. Relying on the public budget to finance operational and maintenance costs of collective infrastructure for example, is not a sustainable solution. The main role of government in relation to finance is to establish the policy, regulatory and institutional framework within which resources from users, financial markets, local budgets and enterprises can be mobilised in a complementary way, and applied as cost-effectively as possible to achieve agreed goals. Hence, the financing strategies can be useful not only to help plan the government budget, but also in suggesting how policy instruments that affect the capacities and decisions of other public and private financial agents might be reformed.

NotesBibliography: p. 110-113
Custom 1202.8

Downloads

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.