Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

Topics

Locations

An evaluation of the financial management of WASH programs in SWASH-plus primary schools

The ongoing costs of supporting water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs in primary schools are not well understood. The Kenyan government provides primary schools with allocated funds to support school operations of school WASH through the Free Primary Education (FPE) Grant, but does not provide dedicated funding to support school WASH. The capacity of primary school administrators with responsibility for maintaining school WASH programs to manage financial components of these systems needs to be described. Spending and budgeting practices at the school level must be better defined in order to effectively plan for support of school WASH, and to advocate for appropriate funding and training support for school administrators. Head teachers hold primary responsibility for financial management and accounting of school WASH funds. The FPE Grant is used for expenditures to support WASH, but schools report inadequate funds and shortages of needed supplies. Budgeting and record-keeping practices at the school level vary widely, and head teachers show varying levels of competency for financial management. Head teachers and other school administrators need to receive effective training in financial management, and funds should be availed for ongoing financial management education and contracting of account clerks as needed. The FPE Grant should include a dedicated budget line for repair, maintenance, and improvement of school WASH systems. Funding amounts should be appropriated to schools based on levels of WASH capacity and needs. [authors abstract]

This is a SWASH+ -output.

TitleAn evaluation of the financial management of WASH programs in SWASH-plus primary schools
Publication TypeResearch Report
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsGallo, K, Mwaki, A, Caruso, B, Ochari, IA, Freeman, M, Saboori, S, Dreibelbis, R, Rheingans, R
Pagination13 p.; 4 tab.
Date Published2012-01-01
PublisherSWASH+ Kenya
Place PublishedNairobi, Kenya
Keywordskenya, schools, treatment costs, water costs
Abstract

The ongoing costs of supporting water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs in primary schools are not well understood. The Kenyan government provides primary schools with allocated funds to support school operations of school WASH through the Free Primary Education (FPE) Grant, but does not provide dedicated funding to support school WASH. The capacity of primary school administrators with responsibility for maintaining school WASH programs to manage financial components of these systems needs to be described. Spending and budgeting practices at the school level must be better defined in order to effectively plan for support of school WASH, and to advocate for appropriate funding and training support for school administrators. Head teachers hold primary responsibility for financial management and accounting of school WASH funds. The FPE Grant is used for expenditures to support WASH, but schools report inadequate funds and shortages of needed supplies. Budgeting and record-keeping practices at the school level vary widely, and head teachers show varying levels of competency for financial management. Head teachers and other school administrators need to receive effective training in financial management, and funds should be availed for ongoing financial management education and contracting of account clerks as needed. The FPE Grant should include a dedicated budget line for repair, maintenance, and improvement of school WASH systems. Funding amounts should be appropriated to schools based on levels of WASH capacity and needs. [authors abstract]

This is a SWASH+ -output.

Notes

With 13 references

Custom 1

128

Citation Key72224

Downloads

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.