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Engaging sanitation entrepreneurs : the market for mechanical pit-emptying in Dakar and the realities of engaging entrepreneurs

Recent work suggests that the local private sector is the predominant supplier of basic sanitation in the developing world. In April 2009 BPD convened a multi-disciplinary roundtable to discuss how the private setor proides sanitation and whether their efforts can be harnessed to serve a development agenda. The focus was very much on what sanitation entrepeneurs are doing in the field and how practically to engage with them. Thirty professionals from differing sectors - from sanitation engineers to health specialists, from Malawian entrepreneurs to financial lenders - debated the role that entrepreneurs currently play, how to support them and what opportunities the sanitation sector may currently be missing. Dakar provided an interesting opportunity for these discussions to focus on a nascent partnership that exists between a range of entrepreneurs and a government agency. Much of this is based around a proposed licensing system for vacuum trucks - the trucs are currently run by range of formal and informal small and medium entreprises. These negotiations build on a large donor-supported programme to expand access to sanitation for poorer households in Dakar. [authors abstract]

TitleEngaging sanitation entrepreneurs : the market for mechanical pit-emptying in Dakar and the realities of engaging entrepreneurs
Publication TypeCase Study
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBereziat, E
Pagination8 p.; 2 fig.; 2 boxes
Date Published04/2009
Publication LanguageEnglish
Keywordscase studies, excreta collection, excreta disposal systems, excreta treatment, faeces, human excreta, investment, pit latrines, senegal dakar, sludge treatment
Abstract

Recent work suggests that the local private sector is the predominant supplier of basic sanitation in the developing world. In April 2009 BPD convened a multi-disciplinary roundtable to discuss how the private setor proides sanitation and whether their efforts can be harnessed to serve a development agenda. The focus was very much on what sanitation entrepeneurs are doing in the field and how practically to engage with them. Thirty professionals from differing sectors - from sanitation engineers to health specialists, from Malawian entrepreneurs to financial lenders - debated the role that entrepreneurs currently play, how to support them and what opportunities the sanitation sector may currently be missing. Dakar provided an interesting opportunity for these discussions to focus on a nascent partnership that exists between a range of entrepreneurs and a government agency. Much of this is based around a proposed licensing system for vacuum trucks - the trucs are currently run by range of formal and informal small and medium entreprises. These negotiations build on a large donor-supported programme to expand access to sanitation for poorer households in Dakar. [authors abstract]

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