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End Water Poverty: Outcomes report Africa Water Week 2016

As a global civil society coalition, one of End Water Poverty's priority work areas is to support national and regional organisations to help ensure a strong, united civil society. This is a critical step in achieving our common vision of ending the water and sanitation crisis. As part of this mandate, End Water Poverty recently supported the African Civil Society Network on Water and Sanitation (ANEW) in engaging in the 6th African Water Week, held in July in Tanzania. Africa Water Week is a biennial conference of African Water Ministers organised by the African Ministers' Council on Water (AMCOW). This conference is the only platform on the continent where governments, donors, practitioners and civil society meet to discuss leading issues of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues. It offers a unique opportunity for assessing current progress towards achieving universal access across the region. This report is a result of the discussions and meetings held before and at the conference with the various actors.

 

TitleEnd Water Poverty: Outcomes report Africa Water Week 2016
Publication TypeConference Report
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsEnd Water Poverty
Pagination7 p.
Date Published09/2016
PublisherEnd Water Poverty (EWP)
KeywordsAMCOW, ANEW, CSO, EWP, government organizations
Abstract

As a global civil society coalition, one of End Water Poverty's priority work areas is to support national and regional organisations to help ensure a strong, united civil society. This is a critical step in achieving our common vision of ending the water and sanitation crisis. As part of this mandate, End Water Poverty recently supported the African Civil Society Network on Water and Sanitation (ANEW) in engaging in the 6th African Water Week, held in July in Tanzania. Africa Water Week is a biennial conference of African Water Ministers organised by the African Ministers' Council on Water (AMCOW). This conference is the only platform on the continent where governments, donors, practitioners and civil society meet to discuss leading issues of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues. It offers a unique opportunity for assessing current progress towards achieving universal access across the region. This report is a result of the discussions and meetings held before and at the conference with the various actors.

 

Full Text

As a global civil society coalition, one of End Water Poverty's priority work areas is to support national and regional organisations to help ensure a strong, united civil society. This is a critical step in achieving our common vision of ending the water and sanitation crisis. As part of this mandate, End Water Poverty recently supported the African Civil Society Network on Water and Sanitation (ANEW) in engaging in the 6th African Water Week, held in July in Tanzania. Africa Water Week is a biennial conference of African Water Ministers organised by the African Ministers' Council on Water (AMCOW). This conference is the only platform on the continent where governments, donors, practitioners and civil society meet to discuss leading issues of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues. It offers a unique opportunity for assessing current progress towards achieving universal access across the region. This report is a result of the discussion and meeting held at the conference.

Civil society has always been given space to participate in the conference, particularly through presenting addresses in the opening ceremonies. Additionally, in the past, civil society also has had the opportunity to be part of the team responsible for drafting the final outcomes communiqué at the close of the conference. In recent times, AMCOW has expressed concern with the quality of civil society input into the conference itself, as civil society was not united and was unable to input effectively in the processes in previous events. ANEW is an important and long running African civil society network, bringing organisations together from across the region. ANEW has been experiencing difficulties of late, as the network has very limited human resources and capacity to realise their plans and activities. This has reduced the network's ability to be reflective and responsive to issues, and to push for an active, united civil society across the region. The most recent conference however was a very positive turning point for the ongoing relationship between ANEW and AMCOW, and for strengthening ANEW's network and presence.

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.