Skip to main content

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.

The elusive effect of water and sanitation on the global burden of disease

While the ancient Romans may already have been aware of it, water and sanitation came to be regarded as key to improve health in the growing cities of Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A number of notable observational studies were carried out that even with the limited epidemiological tools available at the time all but proved the direct link between water, sanitation and health. By contrast, in the early days of development aid in the post-colonial era, water and sanitationwere often not regarded as a health issue, but primarily provided with the aim of making people’s life easier and enable developmental activities. Whoever tried to argue for more investment on health grounds was faced by a lack of epidemiological studies conducted in low-income settings, which led to a renewed interest in research from the 1970s. [authors abstract] 

TitleThe elusive effect of water and sanitation on the global burden of disease
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsSchmidt, W.-P.
Secondary TitleTropical medicine & international health
Volumevol. 19
Issueno. 5
Paginationp. 522–527
Date Published02/2014
Publication LanguageEnglish and French
Keywordsdisease burden, sanitation, water
Abstract

While the ancient Romans may already have been aware of it, water and sanitation came to be regarded as key to improve health in the growing cities of Europe and America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A number of notable observational studies were carried out that even with the limited epidemiological tools available at the time all but proved the direct link between water, sanitation and health. By contrast, in the early days of development aid in the post-colonial era, water and sanitationwere often not regarded as a health issue, but primarily provided with the aim of making people’s life easier and enable developmental activities. Whoever tried to argue for more investment on health grounds was faced by a lack of epidemiological studies conducted in low-income settings, which led to a renewed interest in research from the 1970s. [authors abstract] 

Notes

Ref. p. 5

DOI10.1111/tmi.12286
Translated TitleL’effet de l’eau et de l’assainissement sur la charge mondiale de morbidité : un facteur difficile à quantifier

Downloads

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.