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Civil society involvement in provision of sanitation services : case study of Kingugi, Dar Es Salam : paper presented at the East Africa practioners workshop on pro-poor urban sanitation and hygiene, Laico Umbano Hotel, Kigali, Rwanda, march 29th - 31st 2

Dar es Salaam has approximately four million people of which around 70% live in what may be termed as informal settlements. Sanitation service delivery to the poor in Africa’s large cities requires a special approach due to the challenges presented by unclear land tenure, unplanned layout, overcrowding, lack of accurate data, a historic lack of political will to serve the poor. The involvement of women and girls is crucial to effective sanitation projects. Women also have the responsibility for environmental sanitation and home health. The complexity of these challenges coupled with the magnitude of investment required means that utilities should be at the centre of sanitation expansion and complimentary service can be offered by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or the private sector to serve the poor. When responsibilities on sanitation are unclear, it is difficult to track the flow of resources into the sector and measure results. Progress monitoring remains weak and makes the sector vulnerable to corruption. Ineffective regulation, pollution and inadequate or poorly designed sanitation can lead to the destruction of valuable drinking water resources. Utility staff members are trained in a traditional (largely top-down) planning paradigm and are unaccustomed to neighbourhood agreements. Active community participation is essential to building an empowered community. This paper looks at the non-state actor involvement in provision of sanitation services. [authors abstract]

This three-day workshop aims to identify proven good practices in the sanitation and hygiene sector, as well as drawing lessons from failures to enter into the policy dialogue. It focuses on urban sanitation with an emphasis on learning and innovation in the sector. It was organised by : UNICEF, GTZ, WSSCC, WaterAid and IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, and hosted by the Rwandan Ministry of Health.

TitleCivil society involvement in provision of sanitation services : case study of Kingugi, Dar Es Salam : paper presented at the East Africa practioners workshop on pro-poor urban sanitation and hygiene, Laico Umbano Hotel, Kigali, Rwanda, march 29th - 31st 2
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsMulagwand, MJ
Pagination5 p.
Date Published2011-03-31
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedThe Hague, The Netherlands
Keywordsaccess to sanitation, community participation, gender, governance, private sector, sanitation services, service delivery, tanzania dar es salaam
Abstract

Dar es Salaam has approximately four million people of which around 70% live in what may be termed as informal settlements. Sanitation service delivery to the poor in Africa’s large cities requires a special approach due to the challenges presented by unclear land tenure, unplanned layout, overcrowding, lack of accurate data, a historic lack of political will to serve the poor. The involvement of women and girls is crucial to effective sanitation projects. Women also have the responsibility for environmental sanitation and home health. The complexity of these challenges coupled with the magnitude of investment required means that utilities should be at the centre of sanitation expansion and complimentary service can be offered by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or the private sector to serve the poor. When responsibilities on sanitation are unclear, it is difficult to track the flow of resources into the sector and measure results. Progress monitoring remains weak and makes the sector vulnerable to corruption. Ineffective regulation, pollution and inadequate or poorly designed sanitation can lead to the destruction of valuable drinking water resources. Utility staff members are trained in a traditional (largely top-down) planning paradigm and are unaccustomed to neighbourhood agreements. Active community participation is essential to building an empowered community. This paper looks at the non-state actor involvement in provision of sanitation services. [authors abstract]

This three-day workshop aims to identify proven good practices in the sanitation and hygiene sector, as well as drawing lessons from failures to enter into the policy dialogue. It focuses on urban sanitation with an emphasis on learning and innovation in the sector. It was organised by : UNICEF, GTZ, WSSCC, WaterAid and IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, and hosted by the Rwandan Ministry of Health.

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.