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Changing water-use patterns in a water-poor area : lessons for a trachoma intervention project

An epidemiological survey carried out in the Dodoma region of Tanzania found that high rates of trachoma infection in pre-school children were associated with unwashed faces. Prior to a planned trachoma intervention project, a pilot study was done on household decisions about water use and perceptions about face washing and eye disease. The study found that mothers overestimated the amount of water necessary to wash a child's face. In addition, mothers would not change their water-use priorities without the consent of their husbands and the support of the community. Therefore a health education programme was designed to address the perception that face washing required a great deal of water. The programme also sought to involve and re-educate the whole community rather than focus only on the mothers who were most likely to wash the children's faces.

TitleChanging water-use patterns in a water-poor area : lessons for a trachoma intervention project
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1990
AuthorsWest, S., Lynch, M., McCauley, A.P., Pounds, M.B.
Paginationp. 1233-1238
Date Published1990-01-01
Keywordsattitudes, child health, decision making, health education, personal washing, tanzania, tanzania dodoma, trachoma, women
Abstract

An epidemiological survey carried out in the Dodoma region of Tanzania found that high rates of trachoma infection in pre-school children were associated with unwashed faces. Prior to a planned trachoma intervention project, a pilot study was done on household decisions about water use and perceptions about face washing and eye disease. The study found that mothers overestimated the amount of water necessary to wash a child's face. In addition, mothers would not change their water-use priorities without the consent of their husbands and the support of the community. Therefore a health education programme was designed to address the perception that face washing required a great deal of water. The programme also sought to involve and re-educate the whole community rather than focus only on the mothers who were most likely to wash the children's faces.

NotesIncludes references
Custom 1245.2

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.