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A brief history of hand drilled wells in Niger : only the beginning

This field note traces the development of wells and water-lifting technology in the water scarce country of Niger. It describes a range of hand-augering and water-lifting techniques that have been introduced over the past 30 years, primarily in southern Niger. It traces the role of non-government organizations in terms of pioneering the technology and supporting the growth of a locally based business environment to increase access to the relevant technologies. The research points to the necessity for investment in the early stages – to develop and test the technologies within specific localities, build the skills of independent drillers and pump manufacturers, and careful support to private sector market development.
The survey shows that hand-augered wells fitted with very low-cost water-lifting devices are a viable water source for both domestic and agricultural water supply in several parts of Niger. Despite their poverty, thousands of households have been willing and able to pay for the construction of these wells and simple lifting devices for their fields and homes.
There is also considerable potential for hand-drilling technologies that can penetrate harder formations and drill to greater depths, and for the corresponding water-lifting technologies. Hand percussion drilling and rope pumps could provide water to numerous small communities in Niger, which are currently not included in the
government plans. The technologies presented here could also benefit other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Recommendations for the way forward are included.

TitleA brief history of hand drilled wells in Niger : only the beginning
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsDanert, K.
Secondary TitleField note / WSP
Pagination15 p. : 1 fig, 1 map, 5 boxes, 1 tab., photogr.
Date Published2006-10-01
PublisherWater and Sanitation Program - African Region
Place PublishedNairobi, Kenya
Keywordsdrilled wells, manual drilling, marketing, niger, percussion drilling, planning, private sector, rope-and-washer pumps, safe water supply, sdiafr, sdiwat, treadle pumps, water quality, water use
Abstract

This field note traces the development of wells and water-lifting technology in the water scarce country of Niger. It describes a range of hand-augering and water-lifting techniques that have been introduced over the past 30 years, primarily in southern Niger. It traces the role of non-government organizations in terms of pioneering the technology and supporting the growth of a locally based business environment to increase access to the relevant technologies. The research points to the necessity for investment in the early stages – to develop and test the technologies within specific localities, build the skills of independent drillers and pump manufacturers, and careful support to private sector market development.
The survey shows that hand-augered wells fitted with very low-cost water-lifting devices are a viable water source for both domestic and agricultural water supply in several parts of Niger. Despite their poverty, thousands of households have been willing and able to pay for the construction of these wells and simple lifting devices for their fields and homes.
There is also considerable potential for hand-drilling technologies that can penetrate harder formations and drill to greater depths, and for the corresponding water-lifting technologies. Hand percussion drilling and rope pumps could provide water to numerous small communities in Niger, which are currently not included in the
government plans. The technologies presented here could also benefit other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Recommendations for the way forward are included.

NotesIncludes references
Custom 1824, 212.5

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.