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Blue gold : the global water crisis and the commodification of the world's water supply

This report stresses that water is a vital resource which should not become a commodity sold to the highest bidder, and advocates that access to clean water for basic needs is a fundamental human right. It discusses the world-wide water crisis and the negative effects of economic globalization, privatization and the bulk water trade on water resources and water supply services, especially for domestic consumers. Governments are criticized for not responding adequately to the water crisis, providing subsidies to industry, and for the absence of legislation to safeguard water supplies. The report also warns that transnational companies are using their membership in international bodies such as the World Water Council and Global Water Partnership to promote their own business interests. International treaties, which supersede national law, are favouring transnational water exports by the private sector. The report concludes with ten principles for protecting water and a citizen's guide action.

TitleBlue gold : the global water crisis and the commodification of the world's water supply
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsBarlow, M.
Pagination87 p.
Date Published2001-05-01
PublisherInternational Forum on Globalization
Place PublishedSan Francisco, CA, USA
Keywordsaccess to water, human rights, international level, legislation, policies, sdipol, socioeconomic impact, water resources management, water rights, water shortage
Abstract

This report stresses that water is a vital resource which should not become a commodity sold to the highest bidder, and advocates that access to clean water for basic needs is a fundamental human right. It discusses the world-wide water crisis and the negative effects of economic globalization, privatization and the bulk water trade on water resources and water supply services, especially for domestic consumers. Governments are criticized for not responding adequately to the water crisis, providing subsidies to industry, and for the absence of legislation to safeguard water supplies. The report also warns that transnational companies are using their membership in international bodies such as the World Water Council and Global Water Partnership to promote their own business interests. International treaties, which supersede national law, are favouring transnational water exports by the private sector. The report concludes with ten principles for protecting water and a citizen's guide action.

Notes40 ref.
Custom 1202.3, 210

Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.