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The Bikita experience : Bikita integrated rural water supply and sanitation project

This video is a comprehensive record of the planning and implementation of the Bikita Integrated Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project in Zimbabwe. It starts with the planning phase, explaining the importance of community involvement in the project, with emphasis on village based community information (VBCI), ownership of stakeholders, comprehensive information gathering, and full community involvement. The second part deals with the water supply through boreholes, deep wells, and rehabilitated old water points and family wells. Water testing, community-based management, water point user committees, maintenance, water point security and hygiene, and water use are discussed. Health education and the formation of village health clubs are included in the project as well as school health education. Part three on sanitation explains the advantages of the Blair VIP (ventilated improved pit) latrines and the use of upgradable pit latrines for those who cannot afford a VIP latrine. The aim is for maximum coverage, gender parity and flexibility. Involvement of women in the project is secured by appointing them as members of the water committees and training them as latrine builders. The last part deals with project management done by the Rural District Council which supports project activities and gathers, stores and disseminates information. Keys to project management are ownership, vision, and accountability. Decentralization to district level has given districts full responsibility and accountability for project funds.

TitleThe Bikita experience : Bikita integrated rural water supply and sanitation project
Publication TypeAudiovisual
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsGB, DFIDUnited Kin
Paginationvideo (38 min.) : VHS
Date Published2000-01-01
PublisherUnited Kingdom, Department for International Development
Place PublishedLondon, UK
Keywordsbikita integrated rural water supply and sanitation project (zimbabwe), blair latrines, community participation, decentralization, financial management, gender, health education, planning, projects, rural areas, safe water supply, sanitation, sdiafr, sdipar, ventilated improved pit latrines, water committees, zimbabwe victoria bikita
Abstract

This video is a comprehensive record of the planning and implementation of the Bikita Integrated Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project in Zimbabwe. It starts with the planning phase, explaining the importance of community involvement in the project, with emphasis on village based community information (VBCI), ownership of stakeholders, comprehensive information gathering, and full community involvement. The second part deals with the water supply through boreholes, deep wells, and rehabilitated old water points and family wells. Water testing, community-based management, water point user committees, maintenance, water point security and hygiene, and water use are discussed. Health education and the formation of village health clubs are included in the project as well as school health education. Part three on sanitation explains the advantages of the Blair VIP (ventilated improved pit) latrines and the use of upgradable pit latrines for those who cannot afford a VIP latrine. The aim is for maximum coverage, gender parity and flexibility. Involvement of women in the project is secured by appointing them as members of the water committees and training them as latrine builders. The last part deals with project management done by the Rural District Council which supports project activities and gathers, stores and disseminates information. Keys to project management are ownership, vision, and accountability. Decentralization to district level has given districts full responsibility and accountability for project funds.

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.