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The Advocacy Source Book

Section 1 looks at the theory of advocacy work, introducing some key concepts and preparing the reader for the self-analysis, research and planning processes that must be carried out before effective advocacy work can be started.

Section 2 examines advocacy as it specifically relates to WaterAid’s work to improve the water supply and sanitation (WSS) situation of some of the world’s poorest people, particularly in the context of the UN Millennium Development Goals.

Section 3 examines the issue of involving grassroots communities in advocacy work, and provides some tools and case studies on how to make this central to advocacy action plans, rather than merely an add-on.

Section 4 introduces the advocacy planning cycle, and outlines the steps an organisation needs to take as it plans advocacy work, including analysing your issue, identifying targets, and identifying the means to influence those targets.

Section 5 begins to provide the tools you will need to put advocacy action plans into practice, including an analysis of the importance of drawing up effective partnerships. It offers some different theoretical ways to approach advocacy work.

Section 6 offers some concrete tools that can be used to carry out advocacy work.

Section 7 covers the ever-important issue of monitoring and evaluation.

Section 8 offers information and links to useful listserves, networks and organisations.

In the Annexe, we have provided some tools, pro-formas, tables and diagrams which advocacy workers may like to reproduce, adapt or distribute; or merely to use as a basis to create something more tailored to their own advocacy campaign.

TitleThe Advocacy Source Book
Publication TypeBook
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsLondon, GBWaterAid -
Pagination118 p. : fig., tab.
Date Published09/2007
PublisherWaterAid
Place PublishedLondon, UK
Keywordsadvocacy, case studies, community participation, ghana, india, non-governmental organizations, objectives, planning, sdicom, uganda, zambia, zimbabwe
Abstract

Section 1 looks at the theory of advocacy work, introducing some key concepts and preparing the reader for the self-analysis, research and planning processes that must be carried out before effective advocacy work can be started.

Section 2 examines advocacy as it specifically relates to WaterAid’s work to improve the water supply and sanitation (WSS) situation of some of the world’s poorest people, particularly in the context of the UN Millennium Development Goals.

Section 3 examines the issue of involving grassroots communities in advocacy work, and provides some tools and case studies on how to make this central to advocacy action plans, rather than merely an add-on.

Section 4 introduces the advocacy planning cycle, and outlines the steps an organisation needs to take as it plans advocacy work, including analysing your issue, identifying targets, and identifying the means to influence those targets.

Section 5 begins to provide the tools you will need to put advocacy action plans into practice, including an analysis of the importance of drawing up effective partnerships. It offers some different theoretical ways to approach advocacy work.

Section 6 offers some concrete tools that can be used to carry out advocacy work.

Section 7 covers the ever-important issue of monitoring and evaluation.

Section 8 offers information and links to useful listserves, networks and organisations.

In the Annexe, we have provided some tools, pro-formas, tables and diagrams which advocacy workers may like to reproduce, adapt or distribute; or merely to use as a basis to create something more tailored to their own advocacy campaign.

Notes

Bibliography : p. 113-115

Custom 1

204.3

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.