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Achieving safely managed water services in Africa

Unpacking the challenge of achieving safely managed water services in Africa: based on a discussion convened by IRC for the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, 18 March 2021. The e-Learning event was convened to unpack the priorities and strategies for pursuing safely managed water services while leaving no-one behind.

TitleAchieving safely managed water services in Africa
Publication TypeBriefing Note
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsConrad N. Hilton Foundation
Corporate AuthorsIRC
Pagination6
Publication LanguageEnglish
KeywordsBasic service, drinking water, Human right to water, safe water, Sustainable development goals, universal access to water
Abstract

Unpacking the challenge of achieving safely managed water services in Africa: based on a discussion convened by IRC for the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, 18 March 2021. The e-Learning event was convened to unpack the priorities and strategies for pursuing safely managed water services while leaving no-one behind.

Citation Key87644
Full Text

We've all committed to achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all. A safely managed drinking water service is from an improved source that is located on premises, available when needed and free from contamination. This special open and virtual event, part of the e-learning series of the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and partners, was focused on the challenge of delivering safely-managed drinking water services in sub-Saharan Africa.

In 2017, 27% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa received safely-managed water services. These were mainly located in urban areas where 50% enjoy access. At the same time, only 12% of rural citizens had a safely managed service. The implication of the SDG agenda is that basic is no longer good enough: a basic service simply cannot meet the quality standards necessary to respect the human right to clean water. Nevertheless, the step from basic to 'safely managed' is a daunting one, and unlikely to be achieved.

In the webinar, through a series of panel discussions and break out groups, we unpacked what the implications of a 'safe water agenda' are to communities, service-providers and local and national governments by addressing key learning questions. This briefing note summarises the results of the discussion and serves as a call to action to service providers, governments, research and support agencies. 

Main question: What are the priorities and strategies in going beyond basic and aspiring to safely managed water services - while leaving no-one behind?

Sub-questions:

What are the options?
To accelerate safely managed supplies in easier to serve areas (including towns, peri-urban etc.)
To move beyond basic in harder to serve areas (including many rural settings and especially those with dispersed settlement, difficult topographies etc.)
To approach the challenge in schools and health care facilities
Who can deliver these options? What are the service delivery models?
Professional service providers: National utilities / Private sector
Is there still room for community management?
What is the place of self supply?
What changes are required in the system to enable 1 & 2?
What political, institutional and financial changes are required to enable this to happen (from local to global levels)
Break out groups will look at what we can learn from Ethiopia, Ghana and Uganda (where Conrad N. Hilton Foundation's support is focused) and other experiences to date in peri-urban and rural sub-Saharan Africa contexts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Disclaimer

The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.