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About corruption and transparency in the water and sanitation sector

This paper is a brief overview of issues, approaches and information resources. The second half of the paper provides entry to the rapidly growing literature on corruption, transparency and honesty in the WASH sector. Corruption undermines water and sanitation services. It is those without a voice, the poor, who are systematically deprived by corrupt systems. Using resources honestly and effectively, rather than using more resources is arguably an answer to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for sustained water and sanitation services that reach the poor. However, there has been relatively little work to enhance honesty and transparency and reduce corruption specifically in the WASH sector. While there have been effective initiatives, these seem to remain isolated examples of good practice. A long-term perspective with sector-specific work on parallel fronts seems most realistic.

TitleAbout corruption and transparency in the water and sanitation sector
Publication TypeLiterature Review
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsShordt, K., Stravato, L., Dietvorst, C.
Secondary TitleThematic overview paper / IRC
Volumeno. 16
Pagination39 p. : tab.
Date Published2006-12-01
PublisherIRC
Place PublishedDelft, The Netherlands
Keywordscommunity participation, corruption, decentralization, institutional aspects, low-income communities, planning, policies, sanitation, sdiman, water supply
Abstract

This paper is a brief overview of issues, approaches and information resources. The second half of the paper provides entry to the rapidly growing literature on corruption, transparency and honesty in the WASH sector. Corruption undermines water and sanitation services. It is those without a voice, the poor, who are systematically deprived by corrupt systems. Using resources honestly and effectively, rather than using more resources is arguably an answer to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for sustained water and sanitation services that reach the poor. However, there has been relatively little work to enhance honesty and transparency and reduce corruption specifically in the WASH sector. While there have been effective initiatives, these seem to remain isolated examples of good practice. A long-term perspective with sector-specific work on parallel fronts seems most realistic.

Notes

Includes references

Custom 1

202.2, 302.2

Citation Key58696

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The copyright of the documents on this site remains with the original publishers. The documents may therefore not be redistributed commercially without the permission of the original publishers.