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Who can promote sanitation?

Published on: 13/10/2012

Typical sanitation promoters are training community health workers and local leaders, council members and members of village water and sanitation committees.

Women leaders have been effective promoters in countries with national women’s unions, women development programmes and active women self-help and savings groups.  

Mobilized school teachers and children have successfully spread household latrines through School-Led Total Sanitation programmes (SLTS). This alternative has worked e.g. in areas with a leadership vacuum and where schools are the only working and accepted government structure, e.g. in Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh and with out-of-school children.

Youth and children have been effective change makers in community-outreach, through youth clubs and school health-club programmes in Uganda and Pakistan (see also SLTS) and in post-triggering programmes for CLTS.

In Bangladesh, in a programme targeting 37 million people, BRAC cooperates with imams and the Masjid Council for Community Advancement, so that 12 khutba (sermons) are delivered over time in the mosque on hygiene, sanitation and the position of women.

Effective motivation is not the prerogative of the public sector and community volunteers. Both in Cambodia and West Bengal the private sector pays local motivators and sales agents a commission for every toilet sold.

Background information and materials referred to in the article:
  • Typical sanitation promoters are trained community health workers and local leaders, council members and members of village water and sanitation committees.
  • Women leaders have been effective promoters in countries with national women's unions, women development programmes and active women self-help and savings groups.
  • In areas with a leadership vacuum and where schools are the only working and accepted government structure, e.g. in Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh and with out-of-school children.
  • Youth and children have been effective change makers in community-outreach, through youth clubs and school-health club programmes in Uganda and Pakistan (see also SLTS reference list, download below)
  • Post-triggering programmes for CLTS.
  • In Bangladesh, in a programme targeting 37 million people, BRAC cooperates with imamsBoth in Cambodia and West Bengal the private sector pays local motivators and sales agents a commission for every toilet sold.

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